Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

January 4, 2000

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

If you are not a regular subscriber and would like to receive our newsletter, send an e-mail to listproc@u.washington.edu In the body of the message, type "subscribe sgteachers YOURNAME" The e-mail account from which you send the message is the account that will receive the newsletter.

If you would like to stop receiving this newsletter, send an e-mail to listproc@u.washington.edu In the body of the message, type the words: unsubscribe sgteachers

Concerned about spam? Please note Space Grant does not sell its address lists.

KENT SCHOOLS CREATE PROJECTS FROM SPACE

The Kent School District has teamed up with MC2 Learning Systems and NASA Quest to create a special program that allows students to collaborate with classes around the world as they research and evaluate what it takes to survive in space. Student projects divided into three grade levels: K-2, 3-5, and 6-7.

The next mission starts March 20. The deadline to sign up is Feb. 25. For a full description of projects, or to register, go to

http://www.mc2learning.com/nasa.html

SPACE SCIENCE NEWS INCLUDES IDEAS FOR TEACHERS

Science@NASA features updates on the latest space science breakthroughs, plus a special resource area for teachers. The Thursday's Classroom includes fun facts, lesson plans and features such as original stories broken out by reading level.

For more information, visit

http://science.msfc.nasa.gov/

CELEBRATE THE RETURN OF OUR RESOURCE CENTER

On Jan. 22, the NASA Regional Educator Resource Center (ERC) will celebrate its grand reopening with an open house and a free workshop for teachers.

Housed in the new Washington NASA Space Grant office at the University of Washington, the center provides K-12 math and science teachers with a wealth of free or low-cost resources including curricula, posters, software, slides and videotapes.

The open house is set from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visitors are welcome to browse the library. Resource coordinator Alex Koerger will be on hand to answer questions.

Inventor and educator Ed Sobey, the author of Fantastic Flying Fun with Science: 69 Projects You Can Fly, Spin, Launch and Ride, will lead a workshop on flying toys for the classroom. The workshop includes materials linked to the Washington EALRs. Workshop enrollment is limited.

To reserve a space, call Alex Koerger, our resource center coordinator, at (206) 543-0214; or e-mail us at

nasa@u.washington.edu

ALBERT EINSTEIN DISTINGUISHED EDUCATOR FELLOWSHIP AVAILABLE

Math and science teachers are invited to apply for the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship. The selected K-12 teachers spend up to one year in Washington, D.C., working with Congressional offices or agencies such as the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Since 1994, Einstein Fellows have established partnerships between federal agencies; created Web-based science education programs; and designed and implemented national science, math, and technology education programs.

Fellows serve eight to 12 months and receive compensation of $4,500 a month, plus moving expenses to Washington. The deadline for applications is Feb. 25. More information is available at

http://www.orau.gov/einstein/

GODDARD ADDS EARTH SCIENCE SITE FOR EDUCATORS

NASA'S Goddard Space Flight Center has created a centralized Web site for their wide array of Earth Science teaching and learning resources.

The Earth Sciences Educator has a links directory and a search engine that spans all of the center's Web-based materials including books, images, data sets, lesson plans, CD-ROMs, games, and topical teaching units. The address of the site is

http://esdcd.gsfc.nasa.gov/ESD/edu/

SPACE DAY 2000 FOCUSES ON LIVING IN SPACE

The Space Day celebration, set for May 4, challenges students in grades 4- 6 to grapple with the design challenges of living and working in space.

The Space Day 2000 site highlights the Design Challenges, but also provides links to live Webcasts, a lesson library and other resources. Early in the year, a series of electronic lessons will beam into classrooms. The Design Challenges, combined with exciting online activities, will incorporate fun elements featuring heroes, adventure and thrills so popular with the "digital" generation.

Further information on the Design Challenges and Space Day 2000 is available at

www.spaceday.com

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@uw.edu