Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

April 5, 2000

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- SUMMER PLANETARY WORKSHOP FOR EDUCATORS
-- NEW MATERIALS EXPLORE EARTH FROM SPACE (GRADES 5-12)
-- FLYING TOYS AUTHOR RETURNS WITH CREATIVITY WORKSHOP
-- SPACE DAY ONLINE LOOKS AT PAST AND FUTURE (AGES 8-12)
-- SHARE YOUR KNOWLEDGE (GRADES K-12)
-- PLANET HUNTERS ON TRAIL OF WORLDS SMALLER THAN SATURN
-- POLAR RESEARCH EXPERIENCES FOR K-12 TEACHERS

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SUMMER PLANETARY WORKSHOP FOR EDUCATORS

Join experienced scientists and educators in an eight-day exploration of the planetary sciences through a study of Washington geology and the latest information about Mars.

Planetary Geology: A Summer Workshop for Teachers gives participants an opportunity to use their new knowledge to develop instructional plans for their classroom or educational setting using NASA and other educational resources. The workshop targets relevant Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRs) and/or National Science Education standards.

The comprehensive program begins with a three-day field trip to the Channeled Scablands of central Washington to examine landscape features analogous to those formed early in the history of Mars, and continues at the University of Washington campus in Seattle with four days of workshops.

Instructors include UW professor and former NASA research scientist Dr. Tony Irving; planetary scientist Dr. Allan Treiman of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston; and Dr. Donald Brownlee, UW astronomer and the principal investigator for the NASA Stardust Mission.

The registration is $75 and includes materials, field trip expenses, final banquet dinner and lodging. For more information, visit

http://www.waspacegrant.org/lpi.html

NEW MATERIALS EXPLORE EARTH FROM SPACE (Grades 5-12)

The "Exploring Earth From Space" Lithograph Set includes instructional materials and photographs taken from the Space Shuttle showing Earth features such as mountains, agriculture, clouds, and urban development.

The accompanying Instructional Materials contain suggestions for using the photographs in studying land changes over time, weather patterns, mathematics and even culture. Among the image packages are forest fires in Sumatra, eruption of the Klyuchevskaya volcano, deforestation in Rondonia Brazil, cloud patterns and space cameras.

To download the set, go to

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Exploring.Earth.From.Space/

FLYING TOYS AUTHOR RETURNS WITH CREATIVITY WORKSHOP

Ed Sobey, author of Fantastic Flying Fun with Science: 69 Projects You Can Fly, Spin, Launch and Ride, returns to the NASA Regional Educator Resource Center on April 29 with a workshop on "juicing up" creativity in the classroom.

The Saturday event is part of the ERC series of free teacher workshops. Workshops take place from 1-4 p.m. at the Space Grant office, Rm. 401, Johnson Hall. Free parking is available on campus. Pre-registration is required and clock hours are available.

Teachers will leave the workshop with activities and hands-on ideas. To register , call (206) 543-1943, or e-mail

nasa@u.washington.edu

For more information on Ed Sobey, see the Seattle Times article "Making Science Fun."

CYBER SPACE DAY LOOKS AT PAST AND FUTURE (AGES 8-12)

Hosted at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, this three-hour online Space Day celebration features discussions with Senator John Glenn and Sally Ride -- as well as other astronauts, entrepreneurs, filmmakers, scientists, and authors -- on space exploration in the 21st century.

The Webcast, co-hosted by nationally recognized broadcast journalists and students, will include interactive surveys, quizzes and questions from around the globe.

The first hour focuses on a day in Space. The second will discuss the challenges in Space and the last tries to answer the question, Where do we go from here? The event takes place May 4, from noon to 3 p.m. ET. To participate, go to

http://www.spaceday.com/teachers/cyberday.html

SHARE YOUR KNOWLEDGE (GRADES K-12)

The TE-MAT (Teacher Education Materials) Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, is looking for recommendations of published and unpublished materials to review and develop into an online resource for K-12 mathematics and science professional development providers.

Horizon Research, Inc. is collecting materials that are already published and readily available (e.g., commercially published books and videos). The National Center for Improving Science Education is looking for unpublished materials (e.g., materials developed by you and your colleagues for teacher institutes) and out-of-print materials. For more information, or to recommend printed materials, go to

http://te-mat.org/

PLANET HUNTERS ON TRAIL OF WORLDS SMALLER THAN SATURN

Astronomers crossed an important threshold in planet detection with the discovery of two planets that may be smaller in mass than Saturn. Of the 30 extrasolar planets around Sun-like stars detected previously, all have been the size of Jupiter or larger.

Finding Saturn-sized planets reinforces the theory that planets form by a snowball effect of growth from small ones to large, in a star-encircling dust disk For images, animations and additional information, go to

http://origins.stsci.edu/news/2000/01

POLAR RESEARCH EXPERIENCES FOR K-12 TEACHERS

The Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) Program is seeking active K-12 science and social science teachers who want to conduct polar research on a real expedition and share their experiences with their students and colleagues.

This unique program is a cooperative effort by the National Science Foundation; Rice University of Houston, Texas; the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) of Hanover, New Hampshire; and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) of New York, New York.

Teachers may also become TEA Associates, collaborating with others in the Polar Learning Community to incorporate on-line journals, CU-SeeMe sessions, and electronic communications into their classroom. Associates, TEAs, and researchers discuss current science topics and new discoveries, as well as develop and test online materials for the polar classroom.

For applications and more information -- including online biographies and journals from Washington participants such as Rolf Tremblay of Goodman Middle School in Gig Harbor and Valerie Sloane of Orcas Island Elementary School in Eastsound, go to

http://tea.rice.edu

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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