Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

October 24, 2000

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

--MINI-GRANT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE (K-12)
--NASA EDUCATION DIRECTORY UNVEILED (K-12)
--EARTH SCIENCE SITE CENTRALIZES IDEAS (K-12)
--COMPETITION ENVISONS THE FUTURE (K-12)
--30,000 NEW MARS IMAGES AVAILABLE

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MINI-GRANT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE NOW (K-12)

Applications for the 2000-01 Washington Space Grant Mini-grants were mailed out last week with our fall newsletter, but teachers may download additional copies from our Web site.

Space Grant awards up to $250 per proposal. The mini-grants support a wide range of innovative science and math projects in areas such as astronomy, rocketry and weather. The mini-grants are open to teachers in both public and private schools, as well as certified home school teachers. Proposals are due at the Space Grant office Nov.17.

If you have questions about the mini-grant program, or would like to request an application, please call the Space Grant office in Seattle at (206) 543-1943, or go to our Web site at

http://www.waspacegrant.org

NASA EDUCATION DIRECTORY UNVEILED (K-12)

This month NASA released an online Space Science Education Resource Directory that allows teachers to search for materials by grade level as well as by topic.

For instance, a fourth grade teacher searching for lessons related to the sun could pinpoint the exact six resource sites that apply to their topic and audience. Subjects include space, physical and earth sciences. Visit the directory at

http://teachspacescience.stsci.edu

EARTH SCIENCE SITE CENTRALIZES IDEAS (K-12)

Teachearth.com, a database of free classroom programs and activities, was rated "outstanding" by a NASA peer review pane. The site includes a state-by-state guide to local and regional links. You can also recommend program, activity, or resource. For more information, go to

http://teachearth.com/

COMPETITION ENVISONS THE FUTURE (K-12)

Toshiba and the National Science Teachers Association are challenging students to envision the technology of the future.

Teams of students select a technology, research how it works and why it was invented, and then project how that technology may change in the future. They must then identify what breakthroughs are required for their vision to become a reality and describe the positive and negative consequences of their technology on society. Winning ideas have focused on things as simple as ballpoint pens and as complex as satellite communications.

First prizes -- a U.S. Savings Bond of $10,000 for each student -- will be awarded to four teams. Twenty-four regional winners will receive a digital camera for each student and teacher, and a laptop computer for each regional winning school. The competition deadline is Feb. 2. For more information, go to

http://www.toshiba.com/tai/exploravision/

30,000 NEW MARS IMAGES AVAILABLE

The imaging team of NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has doubled the number of Mars pictures available to the public with the release of a new archive of red planet pictures totally slightly more than 30,000 images. Visit the archives at

http://www.msss.com/moc_gallery/

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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