Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

March 27, 2001

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- SUMMER WORKSHOPS PLANNED (3-12)
-- KIDS' EARTHQUAKE SITE AVAILABLE (K-12)
-- STAYING COOL ON THE ISS
-- WATER IN THE EARTH SYSTEM COURSE (K-12)
-- SPACE SCIENCE FOR THE CLASSROOM (1-12)

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TWO SUMMER WORKSHOPS PLANNED (3-12)

Washington NASA Space Grant will offer two in-depth summer workshops for teachers. The first one, geared to middle school and high school teachers, will focus on volcanoes. The second, designed for elementary and middle school teachers, explores astronomy topics.

Planetary Volcanism, scheduled for July 7-14, combines field trips and classroom work. Participants and instructors will spend four days touring the Cascades volcanic range, then follow up with three days on the UW campus developing hands-on lessons to share their new knowledge with their students. The workshop features instructors from UW and the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Texas. Workshop space is limited. Credit and clock hours are available.

Astounding Astronomy, geared to grades 3-8, will take place July 30-Aug. 3 at the UW Olympic Natural Resources Center in Forks. The workshop targets EALR Levels 1 and 2 for astronomy and related subjects and the approach is inquiry-oriented. Topics include stars and constellations; the day, year, time and the seasons; the scale and contents of the solar system; phases of the moon; and life in the universe, including a brief glimpse beyond our solar system.

For registration and housing information on Astounding Astronomy, contact June at 360-374-3220, extension 232, or e-mail

jpowers@u.washington.edu

For information on Planetary Volcanism, call 206-543-1943, or toll-free, 1-800-659-1943. You can also e-mail us at

nasa@u.washington.edu

KIDS' EARTHQUAKE SITE AVAILABLE (K-12)

Earthquakes for Kids, part of the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, includes links to lesson plans rated by grade level, ideas for earth science fairs and earthquake facts (did you know that the largest recorded earthquake in the world was a magnitude 9.5 (Mw) in Chile on May 22, 1960?). To visit, go to

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/4kids/

STAYING COOL ON THE ISS

In a strange new world where hot air doesn't rise and heat doesn't conduct, the International Space Station's thermal control systems maintain a delicate balance between the deep-freeze of space and the Sun's blazing heat.

"Staying Cool" is the second in a five-part series on the construction of the ISS which is being posted online in installments. The first story examined the Station's architecture and structural design. Future installments will explore the power, plumbing, and ergonomics of the Station. To read the first two stories, go to

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast21mar_1.htm?list125900

WATER IN THE EARTH SYSTEM COURSE (K-12)

The American Meteorological Society (AMS), with funding from the National Science Foundation, is developing an Internet-based course directed towards middle-school teachers, but open to all K-12 teachers.

Water in the Earth System Online incorporates inquiry-based instructional strategies and a holistic concept of Earth from oceanic, atmospheric and terrestrial water and problem-focused perspectives. Participants investigate the mass and energy flows associated with the global water cycle and with related issues.

Local implementation teams have been established in Idaho and Oregon. For information and contacts, visit

http://www.ametsoc.org/amsedu/WES/index.html

SPACE SCIENCE FOR THE CLASSROOM (1-12)

The NASA Regional Educator Resource Center will host two more free Saurday workshops this spring. On April 21, Orchard Heights Elementary teacher Ann Paoletti will share a variety of simple science activities, some of which she picked up by attending really fun and interesting NASA teacher workshops. The workshop is geared to teachers in grades 1-6. Paoletti says she especially looks forward to working with teachers who feel like "newbies" to elementary science teaching.

Ed Sobey -- author of Fantastic Flying Fun with Science: 69 Projects You Can Fly, Spin, Launch and Ride -- returns May 19 with new rocket launching devices K-12 teachers can make and use with inexpensive materials. Participants will build and launch rockets using air pressurized by a bike pump. Additional activities include making pneumatic blast rockets and launchers. Very cool!

All workshops are free and take place from 1-4 p.m. at the Washington NASA Space Grant office, Rm. 401, Johnson Hall. Free parking is available on campus. Pre-registration is required and clock hours are available. To register, call (206) 543-1943, or e-mail

nasa@u.washington.edu

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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