Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

August 6, 2001

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- LIVE FROM MARS 2001 (K-12)
-- TELESCOPES IN EDUCATION TRAINING
-- ROCKETING TO THE FUTURE LITHOGRAPH
-- LOOKING FOR SPACE PHOTOS?
-- FREE NASA LESSONS POSTED WEEKLY (K-12)
-- JUPITER MOVIE PULLS PATTERNS OUT OF CHAOS
-- GENESIS SET TO CATCH A PIECE OF THE SUN (K-12)
-- WOMEN IN SCIENCE ESSAY CONTEST(9-16) --

LIVE FROM MARS 2001 (K-12)

Passport to Knowledge -- public television's longest-running series of interactive learning adventures -- announced two new Mars-centered programs for the 2001-2002 school year. Live From Mars 2001, will air on October 30, 2001, just days after the Odyssey mission reaches Mars orbit. The program takes students behind the scenes for a live update on the spacecraft as it begins to lower itself down towards Mars to begin its science mission.

Live From Mars 2002, slated to air March 19, 2002, will update viewers on new results "just in" from Mars Odyssey, and explains how this information will contribute to understanding the Red Planet as well as our home, the Earth. Students will see how Odyssey's instruments use parts of the electromagnetic spectrum beyond visible light to discover otherwise hidden aspects of Mars' mysterious surface. For information on how to participate, go to

http://passporttoknowledge.com/mars

TELESCOPES IN EDUCATION TRAINING

The Telescopes in Education (TIE) Program will offer a teacher training for those who would like to link their classrooms to a remote control research-quality telescope in California. The workshop will take place Aug. 17-18 in Santa Monica. The two-day training includes morning and afternoon sessions with telescope and CCD camera, and an evening visit to Mount Wilson. For information, go to

http://tie.jpl.nasa.gov/

or contact Joe Wise or Mary Cragg

jwise@kmsi.org
mcragg@earthlink.net

ROCKETING TO THE FUTURE LITHOGRAPH

The NASA educational lithograph "Rocketing to the Future-Upgrading the Space Shuttle" is available on NASA Spacelink.

The front of the lithograph shows the new shuttle "glass cockpit" and the back has information about upgrades to the cockpit, fuel tank, cabin, and main engines. "Rocketing to the Future-Upgrading the Space Shuttle" can be downloaded from

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Upgrading.the.Space.Shuttle/

LOOKING FOR SPACE PHOTOS?

GReat Images in NASA (GRIN) database is now online. This database contains over 1,000 images -- both heavily requested and less familiar -- and is searchable by keyword, subject, field center, and other fields.

The images are available in four formats: thumbnail,small, medium, and large. Images are suitable for everything from quick visual reference to 300 dpi high-resolution images suitable for publishing. All the images are available electronically without charge. Please remember that some larger images may take a bit of time to download. Visit

http://grin.hq.nasa.gov

FREE NASA LESSONS POSTED WEEKLY (K-12)

NASAexplores provides free weekly K-12 educational articles and lesson plans on current NASA projects. Materials can be printed or downloaded. The curriculum resources also meet national education standards. Visit NASAexplores at

http://NASAexplores.com

JUPITER MOVIE PULLS PATTERNS OUT OF CHAOS

A kaleidoscopic movie made from about 1,200 Jupiter images taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveals unexpectedly persistent polar weather patterns on the giant planet.

Long-lived storms and globe-circling belts of clouds are familiar features around Jupiter's midsection, easily seen even in still pictures. Closer to the poles, though, still images show widespread mottling that appears chaotic.

To view the movie, go to

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/videos/jupiter

GENESIS SET TO CATCH A PIECE OF THE SUN (K-12)

NASA'S robotic space explorer Genesis headed out July 31 to do a little sunbathing. Its mission is to catch a wisp of raw material from the luminous celestial body around which the Earth and other planets revolve. Genesis is expected to capture about 10 to 20 micrograms of the solar wind, made up of invisible charged particles expelled by the Sun.

Standards-based curriculum is available. High school modules focus on cosmic chemistry; middle school includes modules on heat, the periodic table, and origin of the solar system. For details, visit

http://genesismission.jpl.nasa.gov

WOMEN IN SCIENCE ESSAY CONTEST(9-16)

For its 30th anniversary, the Association for Women in Science is asking high school students and undergraduates to envision science in the 21st century and women's roles in the field. The essay contest carries cash prizes (first place, $150) and publication in the AWIS magazine. Applications must be postmarked Nov. 9, 2001. For complete information, go the AWIS Web site:

http://www.awis.org/30th.html

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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