Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

October 26, 2001

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- AUTUMN ERC HOURS (K-12)
-- WHAT'S COOKING AT THE ERC? (3-12)
-- NSIP POSTER AND RESOURCE GUIDES AVAILABLE (K-12)
-- X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM ELUSIVE COSMIC OBJECTS
-- SOLVING MARS' WATER MYSTERY?
-- A LOOK AT SCIENTIST STEREOTYPES (8-12)

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AUTUMN ERC HOURS (K-12)

This fall, the NASA Regional Educator Resource Center is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Julie Lutz, the ERC director and associate director for Space Grant, is available by appointment for individual or group consultations. The ERC is located in the Space Grant office, 401 Johnson Hall, on the University of Washington's Seattle campus.

The center offers a wide selection of NASA-developed materials on space flight, astronomy, aeronautics and earth science resources. Materials include curricula, videos, slides, CDs, visual aids and books. To arrange an appointment, call (206) 543-1943, or e-mail

nasaerc@u.washington.edu

WHAT'S COOKING AT THE ERC? (K-12)

Free Saturday workshops at the NASA Regional Educator Resource Center will continue into the new year with Fueled for Flight, a session aimed at helping teachers introduce food and nutrition to their K-5 students. On Jan. 26, NASA Aerospace Education Specialist Brian Hawkins will present activities that emphasize the importance of a balanced diet both on Earth and in space. All participants will receive a kit of lessons and activities, as well as a videotape.

Space is also still available in the fall workshops. On Nov. 10, Ed Sobey -- author of Fantastic Flying Fun with Science: 69 Projects You Can Fly, Spin, Launch and Ride -- will show teachers of grades 3-9 how to invent toys for science learning. The Dec. 8 workshop with astronomer and ERC Director Julie Lutz will focus on the sun and its affect on the Earth.

All workshops will take place 1-4 p.m. in Johnson Hall 401 on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Free parking is available on campus. Pre-registration is required and clock hours are available. To register, call (206) 543-1943, or e-mail

nasaerc@u.washington.edu

NSIP POSTER AND RESOURCE GUIDES AVAILABLE (K-12)

The poster "NASA Student Involvement Program" (NSIP) and the 2001-2002 versions of the NSIP Resource Guides are available on NASA Spacelink. NSIP is a national program of six unique investigations and challenges for students in grades K-12.

A new investigation "Aerospace and Technology Engineering Challenge" as well as additional individual and whole class divisions have been added this year. Complete details about entry forms, competition rules, checklists, judging rubrics, rewards and resource guides are available on the NSIP Web site:

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/Educational.Services/NASA.Education.Programs/Stude nt.Support/NASA.Student.Involvement.Program.-.NSIP/

X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM ELUSIVE COSMIC OBJECTS

A type of celestial object that has long stumped astronomers has been found to emit X-rays, thus proving a theory of how the objects form. Herbig Haro objects are found in regions where new stars are forming.

They are nebulae, or dust and gas clouds. They form when high-velocity gas emitted from young stars collides with clouds of interstellar material. The collision heats the gas in the surrounding nebula to sufficiently high temperatures to produce X-rays. For more information, visit

http://chandra.nasa.gov

SOLVING MARS' WATER MYSTERY?

An article in The Christian Science Monitor finds us closer to solving Mars' water mystery.

NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey orbiter, a solar-powered digital geologist launched last April, is preparing to take up a 2-1/2-year search for clues to the story of water - and, perhaps, of life - on Mars. In the process, the craft is breathing new life into US efforts to explore a planet that has captivated the human imagination for millenniums.

For the whole article, go to

http://www.csmonitor.com/2001/1025/p2s1-usgn.html

A LOOK AT SCIENTIST STEREOTYPES (8-12)

On Nov. 5, the UW Chemistry Department will kick off its popular free film and lecture series, Science at the Movies, with a look at scientist stereotypes as geeks and madmen using the comedy "Young Frankenstein." Guest speakers will be members of the freshman chemistry class.

The movie and lecture will take place at 7pm in Room 131 of Bagley Hall on the Seattle main campus. For more information, contact Mary Harty, academic advisor, at (206) 616-9597 or e-mail

harty@chem.washington.edu

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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