Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

January 2, 2002

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- EARTH SCIENCE COURSE ONLINE (5-9)
-- FUELED FOR FLIGHT WORKSHOP (K-5)
-- SOME METEORITES NOT SUGAR-FREE
-- SUMMER S'COOL WORKSHOP APPLICATIONS (3-6)
-- AIAA EVOLUTION OF FLIGHT CONTEST (K-11)
-- NASA'S GLOBAL SURVEYOR SEES POSSIBLE CLIMATE CHANGE ON MARS

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EARTH SCIENCE COURSE ONLINE (5-9)

Middle school teachers may enroll in a NASA-sponsored, online Earth System Science graduate course. The 16-week program was developed at the Center for Educational Technologies, Wheeling Jesuit University. Among other activities, teachers analyze the impact of Earth events on "spheres" (hydro-, bio-, litho- and atmosphere); develop earth systems models; experience the "jigsaw" approach to studying the fundamental "spheres" of ESS; and create ESS activities to use with their students.

The course costs $100 and includes reference books, CD-ROMs and activity guides. Graduate credit will be available for an additional $30 (3 units.) Graduate credit is offered through Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, and will be awarded following their summer semester. For more information about the course and an application, go to

http://www.wested.org/werc/essea/MScourse.html

FUELED FOR FLIGHT WORKSHOP (K-5)

Ever wonder what astronauts eat to maintain their health in space? Come to the free Saturday workshop at NASA Regional Educator Resource Center (RERC) on Jan. 26. Brian Hawkins -- NASA aerospace education specialist -- will present math and science activities designed to give students new ideas about human nutrition. Participants will receive a Fueled for Flight kit including lesson plans and videos.

The workshop will take place 1-4 p.m. in Johnson Hall 401 on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Free parking is available on campus. Pre-registration is required and clock hours are available. To register, call (206) 543-1943, or e-mail

nasa@u.washington.edu

SOME METEORITES NOT SUGAR-FREE

A discovery by a NASA scientist of sugar and several related organic compounds in two carbonaceous meteorites provides the first evidence that another fundamental building block of life on Earth may have come from outer space. A carbonaceous meteorite contains carbon as one of its important constituents.

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v414/n6866/full/414879a_fs.html

SUMMER S'COOL WORKSHOP APPLICATIONS (3-6)

The NASA CERES S'COOL Project will hold their fourth Summer S'COOL Workshop July 17-24 at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. This year's workshop is geared for elementary teachers with minimal science background. Participants will be introduced to S'COOL - Students' Cloud Observations On-Line -- a project that involves school children in real science.

Teachers will learn to classify cloud types and collect other measurements during field observations. They will also become comfortable with using technology in working with data and making comparisons. Room and board as well as travel will be covered for selected participants. Completed applications must be postmarked by March 31, 2002. For more information, visit

http://scool.larc.nasa.gov

or e-mail Joyce Watkins, administrative assistant, at

scool@larc.nasa.gov

AIAA EVOLUTION OF FLIGHT CONTEST (K-11)

The AIAA Evolution of Flight Campaign will again be sponsoring an art contest for children ages 5-16. This year's theme is "2102 ... Life In Space." For more information on contest rules and entry forms, please visit

http://www.flight100.org/what_intro.htm

NASA'S GLOBAL SURVEYOR SEES POSSIBLE CLIMATE CHANGE ON MARS

Scientists have known for years that the polar caps on Mars shrink and grow between the Martian summer and winter seasons. But they wondered just how much carbon dioxide 'snow' is deposited each season. Now new research from a laser onboard the Mars Global Surveyor is providing answers to these questions. For illustrations and information, go to

http://ltpwww.gsfc.nasa.gov/tharsis/snow_paper.html

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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