Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

February 20, 2002

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- STARNET: SUMMER RESEARCH EXPERIENCES (9-12)
-- SCIENCE TEACHERS DOWNUNDER (7-12)
-- NASAEXPLORES OFFERS NEW LESSONS (K-12)
-- DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS OFFERED (7-10)
-- AGI RELEASES NEW EARTH SCIENCE CURRICULUM (9-12)

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STARNET: SUMMER RESEARCH EXPERIENCES (9-12)

The High School Human Genome Program presents StarNet: Research Experiences for Students and Teachers, a weeklong workshop targeted at high school biology/biotechnology teachers. The workshop, which will be held July 15-19 at the University of Washington Seattle campus, is aimed at promoting a better understanding of DNA research among high school students by enabling them, under the guidance of their teachers, to sequence portions of the human genome.

Workshop participants will gain experience with DNA sequencing and ethics modules for successful classroom implementation and participate in seminars by renowned scientists. During the school year, the program provides all necessary equipment, supplies and reagents to participants in the greater Seattle/Tacoma area. Teachers from other parts of the state receive a varying level of support.

Applications must be postmarked by April 15. For more information, visit the Web site at

http://hshgp.genome.washington.edu

or contact Maureen Munn, program director, at (206) 616-4538 or by e-mail

mmunn@u.washington.edu

SCIENCE TEACHERS DOWNUNDER (7-12)

A handful of grants are available for middle and high school teachers who would like to participate in the "Australian-American Fulbright Symposium 2002: Science Education in Partnership" at the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, July 8-12 2002.

The conference will be held in conjunction with the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Symposium 213 scientific meeting, "Bioastronomy 2002: Life Among the Stars. " Bioastronomy is the scientific endeavor to understand the origin and prevalence of life beyond Earth and to answer the age-old questions: "How does life begin?" "Are we alone?" and "What is the future of life?" Diverse scientific disciplines--astronomy, chemistry, biology, geology, physics and other scientific disciplines--contribute to the fundamental scientific research exploring this question.

Papers for oral sessions, hands-on workshops, and posters are being solicited. Abstract deadline is February 28, 2002. Travel grants are available for eligible teachers who contribute to the conference. For information on conference registration, housing, travel grants and abstract submission, please visit:

http://aca.mq.edu.au/fulbright/

NASAEXPLORES OFFERS NEW LESSONS (K-12)

This week's issue of NASAexplores features the articles, "The Inflatable Wing," on aircraft using inflatable wings and "Snakebots To The Rescue," on how robots, designed like snakes, can be used in different situations.

Hands-on lessons include using a balloon to examine pressure and volume changes (9-12) and building a model of a snake and identifying the types of locomotion (K-4). To see the articles and lesson plans, go to

http://www.nasaexplores.com

DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS OFFERED (7-10)

The UW's Diagnoser Project Tools are now available online to teachers and their students. While the focus is on presenting formative assessment questions, the real purpose is to make research on student cognition, learning and teaching available to science and mathematics teachers in grades 7-10. Several sets of questions related to force and motion are presently available. Other materials on waves and algebra will be made available over the next couple of months.

All the present materials are aligned with the state EALRs, and are related to the national standards for science and mathematics. There is no charge for using the tools, but you do need to register as a teacher to have access. To participate, go to

http://tutor.psych.washington.edu

AGI RELEASES NEW EARTH SCIENCE CURRICULUM (9-12)

The American Geological Institute (AGI) released "Earth System Evolution," an inquiry-based Earth science curriculum program for grades 9-12.

The objective was to develop an Earth science curriculum, in accordance with the National Science Education Standards and the American Association for the Advancement of Science-Project 2061's Benchmarks for Science Literacy. The curriculum provides teachers and students with a wide selection of content that meets local interests and course objectives and helps high school students understand fundamental Earth science concepts.

For more information, go to

www.agiweb.org/earthcomm

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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