Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

July 2, 2002

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

Note! The Washington NASA Space Grant Newsletter for Teachers appears only once a month in June and July. We will return to our regular semimonthly publication schedule on August 7.

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- DIVE INTO THE DEEP SEA (7-12)
-- EARTH SYSTEMS CONNECTIONS OFFERED (K-5)
-- REACH FOR THE STARS SUMMER WORKSHOPS (K-12)
-- SIGNALS OF SPRING GUIDES (7-12)
-- PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE
-- NASA EN ESPAÑOL
-- DISTANT SUN MEANS MORE HEAT

--------

DIVE INTO THE DEEP SEA (7-12)

In October, University of Delaware marine scientists will lead a new National Science Foundation expedition to hydrothermal vents on the Pacific Ocean floor -- "Extreme 2002: Mission to the Abyss" -- and middle- and high-school classrooms around the nation are invited to join them via a virtual field trip.

Working aboard the submersible ALVIN and research vessel ATLANTIS, scientists will search out how vent life can survive the extreme temperatures, toxic chemistry, and pressure at the vents. With support from NSF and Sea Grant, the University of Delaware will offer participating teachers free classroom materials including full-color student resource guides, supplementary curricula, a documentary video produced by PBS station WHYY-TV (Wilmington/Philadelphia). They also provide an interactive Web site that will be updated daily during the 26-day expedition with daily logs posted by the crew, photos and video clips from the seafloor, chats with the scientists, and other information.

During the expedition, 40 selected classrooms will also have the opportunity to participate in live conference phone calls with the scientists as they conduct research in ALVIN on the seafloor. Registrations are being accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. To register, sign up at

http://www.ocean.udel.edu/expeditions

EARTH SYSTEMS CONNECTIONS OFFERED (K-5)

Earth Systems Connections, developed by Virginia Tech, The University of Colorado, and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, provides K-5 teachers and students with a set of lessons designed to integrate science, mathematics, and technology in the context of exploring the earth as a system. The main goal is to introduce to primary children the components of the earth system, with emphasis upon appreciating the strong interrelationships that exist within the system.

The curriculum is comprised of three main modules. "GreenLinks" teaches students about the central role of plants in the earth system. "Global Visions" introduces basic concepts regarding satellites and remote sensing. "Migrations del Mundo" uses the phenomenon of animal migration to demonstrate interrelationships among the earth's systems. For curriculum and information, go to

http://www.tandl.vt.edu/esc/

REACH FOR THE STARS SUMMER WORKSHOPS (K-12)

The NASA Regional Educator Resource Center's free summer workshops for teachers offer hands-on activities to meet the Washington EALRs and bring topics like the stars, solar system, and aerospace science into the classroom.

Exploring Aerospace in the Classroom on July 19 will show middle and high schoolteachers how to connect fun activities such as a class expedition to Mars with required science concepts such as Newton's Laws. On Aug. 17, Incorporating Astronomy Content and Activities into Reading, Writing, Art and Music will help teachers meld creativity and science. Separate sessions are offered for teachers of grades K-5 and 6-12.

Workshops take place on the University of Washington campus. Clock hours are available for all workshops. For registration and information, go to

http://www.waspacegrant.org/sumwork.html

SIGNALS OF SPRING GUIDES (7-12)

The Signals of Spring guide for teachers and students, a classroom program for middle and high school science classrooms, uses Earth imagery to explain the movement of animals that are tracked by satellites. Bald eagles, sea turtles and red-tailed hawk are a few of the animals tracked in real-time.

Teaching materials include lessons, classroom activities, and color/B&W transparencies.

For more information, see

http://www.signalsofspring.net

PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE

Space Science Network Northwest (S2N2), directed by NASA Regional Educator Resource Center Director Julie Lutz, is seeking an assistant director. S2N2 facilitates partnerships between NASA's Office of Space Science (Hubble Space Telescope, Mars missions, etc.) and formal/informal educators (K-12, planetariums, museums, clubs, etc.) in the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Alaska and Hawaii.

The position description is posted on the University of Washington jobs directory under the category Research/Science/Laboratory positions. The job number is PC17132 (Continuing Education Specialist 2--Assistant Director). Screening of applications begins Aug. 1. For the complete notice, go to

http://uwjobs.admin.washington.edu/uwjobs

For further information, contact Julie Lutz at 206-543-0214 or

nasaerc@u.washington.edu

NASA EN ESPAÑOL

NASA offers a wealth of online resources in Spanish as well as English. Materials include science news, profiles of role models and curriculum. For a list of NASA sites available in Spanish, go to

http://www.nasa.gov/hqpao/espanol.html

DISTANT SUN MEANS MORE HEAT

Earth reaches its greatest distance from the Sun (aphelion) during the 4th of July holiday weekend. Curiously, our planet is globally warmer when it is farther from the Sun. To learn more about this curious phenomenon, go to

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/02jul_aphelion.htm

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

--------

If you are not a regular subscriber and would like to receive our newsletter, send an e-mail to listproc@u.washington.edu with the following command in the body of your email message: subscribe sgteachers <your name> The e-mail account from which you send the message is the account that will receive the newsletter. If you would like to stop receiving this newsletter, send an e-mail to listproc@u.washington.edu with the following command in the body of your message: unsubscribe sgteachers <your name> Concerned about spam? Please note Space Grant does not sell its address lists.