Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

December 6, 2002

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- BECOME A RADIO STAR (K-12)
-- FINANCIAL AID FOR MUSEUM PROGRAMS AVAILABLE
-- HELP NASA TEST A NEW WEB SITE (9-12)
-- NASA SPONSORS ODYSSEY OF THE MIND PROBLEM (K-16)
-- FINDING IMPACT CRATERS WITH LANDSAT (5-8)
-- LIVING IN SPACE: A HOT SHOWER AND A HUG (K-12)

--------

BECOME A RADIO STAR (K-12)

The Young Producers Contest is an annual event sponsored by the Earth & Sky radio series and the National Science Foundation. Each year, students around the world create their own science radio programs. The five best are aired on the Earth and Sky program in the spring.

Each show should be 75 seconds long and in English. Each entry can have up to four student team members, but there should be only one or two radio hosts. Each team must have an adult sponsor. One individual can sponsor up to three teams. The contest deadline is Dec. 16 For complete information, go to

http://www.earthsky.com/Teachers/YP/

FINANCIAL AID FOR MUSEUM PROGRAMS AVAILABLE

Through December, the Museum of Flight is offering financial assistance to participate in their education programs. Public schools in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Spokane counties that have 35 percent or more, free and reduced lunch count are eligible for aid. Financial assistance is provided by The Boeing Company.

The Museum of Flight has 25 aerospace-related educational programs. Fourteen are outreach programs that can be delivered to the schools. All programs are EALR-aligned. Requests are first-come, first-serve basis until the funding runs out. To request a form please e-mail

education@museumofflight.org

HELP NASA TEST A NEW WEB SITE (9-12)

From January through June, NASA Ames Educational Technology Team is looking for high school teachers to help test Virtual Skies, an online, multimedia educational series. Through each of the seven content sections, students will employ decision-making skills and collaborative strategies while applying principles of algebra, geometry and calculus.

The science portion of these cross-curricular materials includes concepts involved in RADAR, sound and meteorology as it applies to flight. Each section includes online activities complemented by downloadable print materials that can be used to supplement the geography, mathematics and science concepts. All activities correlate to the national standards. Careers in aviation will be showcased as well as NASA research in aviation operations and air traffic management systems.

To apply, visit

http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/projects/aero/virtualskies/teachers/pilot.html

NASA SPONSORS ODYSSEY OF THE MIND PROBLEM (K-16)

This year, NASA is sponsoring The Odyssey of the Mind (OM) School Program's long term problem, "A Scene from Above."

OM fosters creative thinking and problem-solving skills among participating students from kindergarten through college. Students solve problems in a variety of areas from building mechanical devices to giving their own interpretation of literary classics. Through solving problems, students learn lifelong skills.

This year, the team's problem is to design, build and run three small vehicles to transport items from an orbit area to an assembly station. The items will be added to a three-dimensional representation of a scene of the Earth as viewed from space. As the items are added the scene will change. Classroom activities can be tailored to suit the needs of the teacher or to fit any age or grade level. For more information, see

http://www.odysseyofthemind.com/

FINDING IMPACT CRATERS WITH LANDSAT (5-8)

What happens when an extraterrestrial object strikes the Earth? This activity provides students with a way to explore the effects that such a collision and the resulting kinetic energy might have on the land, atmosphere, water, and living things.

Students read about actual impact events and the evidence these leave behind. They study satellite images that show possible evidence of impact events, selecting one or two images to interpret for the class. They also write a series of guidance questions for a field expedition to determine whether or not a given landform is an impact crater.

For more information, go to

http://landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/education/crater/

LIVING IN SPACE: A HOT SHOWER AND A HUG (K-12)

There are many things astronauts can't do in space. Doing without pizza and carbonated drinks, not being able to follow the usual routine. In "A Hot Shower and a Hug," NASAexplores looks at how astronauts adjust to living in space and teach themselves new habits. Lessons for younger students compare pioneer life with space life while older students look at the issues of priorities and nuitrition.

This week, NASAexplores also features K-12 leasons on aerodynamics, air flow, drag, resistance and momentum. To access both sets of articles and lessons, visit

http://www.nasaexplores.com

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

--------

If you are not a regular subscriber and would like to receive our newsletter, send an e-mail to listproc@u.washington.edu with the following command in the body of your email message: subscribe sgteachers <your name> The e-mail account from which you send the message is the account that will receive the newsletter. If you would like to stop receiving this newsletter, send an e-mail to listproc@u.washington.edu with the following command in the body of your message: unsubscribe sgteachers <your name> Concerned about spam? Please note Space Grant does not sell its address lists.