Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

April 22, 2003

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- ASTRONOMY WEEK MAY 5-10
-- SIEMENS WESTINGHOUSE COMPETITION (10-12)
-- SUMMER INSTITUTE IN LIFE SCIENCE (5-8)
-- EXPLORING OUR WORLD: 2003 SCIENCE FORUM (9 and up)
-- LAST WEEK FOR OSPI EALRS SURVEY

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ASTRONOMY WEEK MAY 5-10

To celebrate Astronomy Week, the Pacific Science Center and the University of Washington Astronomy Department will be holding a variety of events. The Pacific Science Center will offer demonstrations, astronomy crafts and planetarium shows May 10-11. Special guests include Seattle Astronomical Society and Solar System Ambassadors. For a detailed schedule, visit

http://www.pacsci.org/astro-week-2003/

On May 10, the UW Astronomy Department will hold its annual open house from 2-5 p.m. There will be children's activities, planetarium shows, moon rocks, and a visit from astronaut George "Pinky" Nelson. The open house takes place in the Physics-Astronomy Building at 15th Avenue Northeast and Northeast Pacific. For a schedule of events, go to

http://www.astro.washington.edu/openhouse.html

SIEMENS WESTINGHOUSE COMPETITION (10-12)

The Siemens Foundation provides more than $1 million in college scholarships and awards each year for talented high school students in the United States.

Its signature programs, the Siemens Westinghouse Competition in Math, Science & Technology and the Siemens Awards for Advanced Placement, reward exceptional achievement in science, math and technology. For more information, go to

http://www.siemens-foundation.org/

SUMMER INSTITUTE IN LIFE SCIENCE (5-8)

The Summer Institute in Life Science at the University of Washington, June 23-July 18, lets teachers experience life science as a process of inquiry and problem solving in content areas emphasized by the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRS).

Study areas at the four-week institute are Investigations with Living Organisms, Interdependence of Organisms, and Cell Biology & Genetics. Each unit features hands-on, investigative activities. The institute will meet daily from 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. It includes a one-day field trip to Eastern Washington and several half-day trips.

All instructional costs and written materials will be paid by the grant. Institute participants will need to pay for parking and lunches. The institute is limited to 20 participants. Campus housing is available, but the costs are not covered by the grant. The application deadline is May 1. For more information, go to

http://www.biology.washington.edu/teachers/

EXPLORING OUR WORLD: 2003 SCIENCE FORUM (9 and up)

The 2003 UW Science Forum highlights renowned University scientists in a lecture series designed to be easily understood by people with a high school science background. The series, which takes place from 7-8:15 p.m. in Kane Hall, is free and open to the general public.

On May 6, Mary Lidstrom, the associate dean for New Initiatives in Engineering, will speak on "Factories of the Future: Bacteria as Miniaturized Environmentally Benign Production Plants." Bacteria have the ability to carry out a broad array of chemical syntheses, more extensive than any existing chemical factory. Lidstrom will discuss the challenges and promise surrounding the use of bacteria as factories of the future, in environmentally benign chemical production and in environmental cleanup.

On May 20, Dennis Hartmann, chair of Atmospheric Sciences, will speak on "The Science of Global Warming: How Will Climate Change the Future?" This lecture will review the evidence for global warming, focusing particularly on the key scientific issues that need to be resolved in order to reduce the uncertainty in projections of future climates and the role of humans in triggering these changes. Discussion will range from tropical clouds to polar sea ice. The lecture will finish with the most likely scenario for climate change in the Pacific Northwest, and what that may mean for the people living here.

Although the lectures are free, the seating is limited. If you plan to attend, please register online:

https://www-s1.cac.washington.edu/alumni/store/scienceforum/2003sf.html

For more information, go to

http://www.washington.edu/alumni/activities/scienceforum/index.html

LAST WEEK FOR OSPI EALRS SURVEY

Through April 25, teachers and others may participate in a Web survey to help refine the Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRs) in reading, mathematics, and science as well as create Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCEs). The electronic survey can be found at:

http://www.k12.wa.us/WebSurvey/wsb.dll/survey/EALRs.htm

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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