Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

May 6, 2003

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- FLY THE WRIGHT WAY (3-10)
-- EXPLORE THE LOST CITY HYDROTHERMAL FIELD
-- FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR K-12 EDUCATORS
-- TALK LIVE TO ISS ASTRONAUTS
-- GLOBE SOIL MOSITURE CAMPAIGN (K-12)

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FLY THE WRIGHT WAY (3-10)

Join NASA Aerospace Education Specialist Brian Hawkins for a six-hour workshop on flight in all its glory -- the history, principles and recent developments. "Learning to Fly the Wright Way," a free NASA Regional Educator Resource Center workshop, will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 16 in Room 137, Johnson Hall, on the University of Washington campus.

The workshop is excellent preparation for a classroom celebration of the Centennial of Flight. Participants will learn how to make several flying contraptions and receive a Centennial of Flight packet with posters, Web site addresses and activities to make students' imaginations soar.

Presentations are tied to the state Essential Academic Learning Requirements and/or the National Science/Math Standards. Lunch is included. Clock hours are available for $15 . For more information and registration, visit

http://www.waspacegrant.org/teaworkshops.html

EXPLORE THE LOST CITY HYDROTHERMAL FIELD

Now through May 22, teachers and students can electronically join researchers aboard the Atlantis as they explore the Lost City Hydrothermal Field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The field was discovered in 2000 during an expedition to investigate how Atlantis Mountain was formed and altered during its 2 million year history.

Students are able to ask questions of the scientists and read journal entries about the current expedition. For more information, go to

http://www.lostcity.washington.edu/mission/index.html

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR K-12 EDUCATORS

DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) at the University of Washington is offering mini-grants to help defray the costs associated with purchasing the adaptive materials, technology, curriculum, and training needed to fully include students with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses and programs.

K-12 educators and outreach programs in Washington are eligible to participate. Mini-grants may be used to fund a variety of products including, but not limited to hardware, software, lab materials, and training. For more information about on mini-grants, paid student internships, mentoring opportunities, and training for educators, please visit

http://www.washington.edu/doit/Programs/nwalliance.html

TALK LIVE TO ISS ASTRONAUTS

The Teaching From Space Program is offering an opportunity for schools to host a live question and answer session with astronauts aboard the International Space Station. During the 20-minute conversation, students would actually use a telephone to ask their questions and would be able to view the ISS astronauts on a TV monitor as they answer. Schools do not need any special equipment to be able to host the event.

Schools that are interested should submit applications that include their plans to involve the community in the event - the more activities they can use to capitalize on the event, the better. Examples include community space fairs, star parties, space-related workshops, connections to local organizations, and curriculum enhancements.

The application deadline is the end of May. To receive a proposal form, please send your request to

nseo@aesp.nasa.okstate.edu

GLOBE SOIL MOSITURE CAMPAIGN (K-12)

Get a jump on next year's class science project by helping collect soil moisture data all around the world for GLOBE's "Campaign Soil Moisture." Teachers and students will be participating in an important scientific project, collecting student research data, preparing for future science fairs, and/or learning about the climate in their own area.

During Earth Science Week (Oct. 11-19), students will collect near-surface soil moisture over as large an area as possible. More details and special data collection worksheets are available at

http://www.hwr.arizona.edu/globe/sci/SM/SMC

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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