Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

February 4, 2004

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE
-- NOBEL WINNER SPEAKS ON ATMOSPHERE
-- ERC OFFERS THREE FREE WORKSHOPS (K-12)
-- MEET TUSKEGEE AIRMAN LEE ARCHER
-- BECOME A DLESE K-12 AMBASSADOR (K-12)
-- ARCTIC ICE BREAK: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

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THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE

On Feb. 10, astronomer and Space Grant Associate Director Julie Lutz will speak at Everett Community College on "The Search for Extraterrestrial Life." the lecture takes place from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Jackson Center. Her talk is sponsored by the Harlow Shapley Visiting Lectureships in Astronomy program of the American Astronomical Society.

Everett Community College is in north Everett, two blocks west of North Broadway, between 10th and Tower Streets. Parking on campus is by permit only. Visitors permits are available in the campus security office in the Parks Student Union building. For more information, go to http://evcc.ctc.edu/template.cfm?doc_id=1653

NOBEL WINNER SPEAKS ON ATMOSPHERE

Nobel Prize winner Dr. Sherwood Rowland will speak Feb. 12 at the University of Washington Bothell campus on "Our Changing Atmosphere in 2004." The event takes place at 7 p.m. in UW2-005.

Rowland won the 1995 Nobel Prize for chemistry for his pioneering research in atmospheric chemistry, explaining the destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer. He is a professor at the University of California at Irvine and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is appearing is in conjunction with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle.

Seating is limited. Reservations should be made by Feb. 10. To attend, send an RSVP to Kai Martin at

kamartin@uwb.edu

For more information on the speaker, go to

http://www.chem.uci.edu/people/faculty/rowland/

ERC OFFERS THREE FREE WORKSHOPS (K-12)

The NASA Regional Educator Resource Center has three free workshops scheduled at its new home on the third floor of UW Condon Hall.

On Feb. 21, NASA Aerospace Education Specialist Brian Hawkins will present a half-day workshop based on the NASA CONNECT video, "Having a Solar Blast," which deals with interactions between the sun and Earth. This workshop is geared to grades 5-9.

On March 20, astronomer and NASA ERC Director Julie Lutz leads a half-day workshop for K-12 teachers on "what's cooking" in the solar system over the next year or so. Discussion topics will include the latest results from Mars Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, the transit of Venus on June 8, and more.

Brian Hawkins returns April 17 with a half-day workshop for teachers of grades 4-9 on how meteorologists, weather officers and NASA researchers use measurement and data analysis to predict severe weather such as hurricanes and heavy rainfall. The workshop includes math and science content, as well as hands-on activities.

For times, location and registration, visit

http://www.waspacegrant.org/teaworkshops.html

MEET TUSKEGEE AIRMAN LEE ARCHER

On Feb. 14, the Museum of Flight celebrates Black History Month with a salute to the heroism and valor of the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II, featuring special guest Lt. Col. Lee A. "Buddy" Archer, USAF (Ret.).

As a pilot with the 302nd Fighter Squadron of the 332nd Fighter Group, the New York native flew 169 combat missions in the Mediterranean Theater. Piloting the P-51C Mustang, Archer shot down five German Messerschmitts, the final three in the course of a single mission on October 12, 1944. Following that engagement, however, rather than being awarded the customary title of "ace," Archer had his initial kill downgraded to a shared victory, leaving his official tally at four-and-a-half. In 1971, Archer retired from a distinguished Air Force career (that included service in Korea) and went on to an equally impressive career as a business and civic leader.

Air Force Academy cadets later researching combat records found no evidence of any other pilot having earned the half victory that had been taken from Archer. During an Academy ceremony, the cadets recognized Archer as the only Tuskegee ace, although his official record remains, inexplicably, only four-and-a-half victories. Retired Lt. Col. Archer will speak at a multimedia presentation at 2 p.m. and afterward answer questions from the audience and sign autographs. For more information, visit

http://www.museumofflight.org

BECOME A DLESE K-12 AMBASSADOR

The Digital Library for Earth System Education is offering ambassador training at the upcoming NSTA National Conference in Atlanta, April 1-4.

Training will include an overview of all aspects of the digital library and a discussion of effective promotional strategies to represent DLESE at their state and local education meetings. Teachers selected to participate in the NSTA workshop will receive one night of lodging and dinner in Atlanta. Logistical and financial support will be available and a $200 honorarium will be given after the teacher successfully makes two presentations at state or local professional society meetings.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest, including home and work contact information, the number of years you have taught, present grade level(s) and subject(s) that you teach, and examples of your past leadership activities in education (workshops, presentations, etc), to Bryan Aivazian at

bryana@trib.com

To visit the library, go to

http://www.dlese.org

ARCTIC ICE BREAK: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

In the summer of 2002, graduate student Derek Mueller made an unwelcome discovery: the biggest ice shelf in the Arctic was breaking apart.

The bad news didn't stop there. Lying along the northern coast of Ellesmere Island in northern Canada, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf had dammed an epishelf lake, a body of freshwater that floats on denser ocean water. When the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf fractured, the epishelf lake suddenly drained out of Disraeli Fiord, spilling more than 3 billion cubic meters of fresh water into the Arctic Ocean.

What does this tell us about the impacts of climate change on life in the Arctic? To learn more, go to

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Study/wardhunt/

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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