Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

March 17, 2004

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- PROJECT ASTROBIO TEACHERS & SCIENTISTS WANTED
-- HUBBLE'S DEEPEST VIEW EVER
-- MATH RESOURCES AVAILABLE (6-8)
-- EARLY WARNINGS FOR OUTBREAKS
-- MAPPING A HEALTHY FUTURE OPEN HOUSE
-- MYSTERIOUS SEDNA

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PROJECT ASTROBIO TEACHERS & SCIENTISTS WANTED

Project AstroBio, formerly known as Project Astro, is recruiting new teachers and science partners to team up for the purpose of presenting hands-on activities in astronomy, biology, geology, and on the overarching theme of astrobiology in the classroom.

There are currently 63 active Project AstroBio partnerships in the Puget Sound area. Applications are due May 1. Participants and their partners must attend a two-day training workshop, August 13-14. For more information, go to

http://www.astro.washington.edu/projastrobio

To receive an application, contact Linda Khandro, coordinator, at (206)543-9541 or

lindak@astro.washington.edu

HUBBLE'S DEEPEST VIEW EVER

Astronomers at the Space Telescope Science Institute unveiled the deepest portrait of the visible universe ever achieved by humankind.

Called the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), the million-second-long exposure reveals the first galaxies to emerge from the so-called "dark ages," the time shortly after the big bang when the first stars reheated the cold, dark universe. The new image should offer new insights into what types of objects populated the universe long ago. For more information, visit

http://www10.ksc.nasa.gov/mirrors/stsci/hubbledev/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/2004/07/index.html

MATH RESOURCES AVAILABLE (6-8)

The NewMedia Project area of MathStar is now offering an Integers unit composed of three lessons: Introducing Integers, Adding/Multiplying Integers, and Subtracting Integers. Each lesson includes video clips, worksheets, Flash activities and Web resources. The lessons conform to national mathematics standards.

MathStar -- a five-year project funded through the U.S. Department of Education -- seeks to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics through the use of interactive technologies. The project is administered by the Los Angeles County Office of Education. For more information, go to

http://mathstar.lacoe.edu/newmedia/integers/welcome.html

EARLY WARNINGS FOR OUTBREAKS

Last year more than a million people died of malaria, mostly in sub-saharan Africa. Outbreaks of dengue fever, hantavirus, West Nile fever, Rift Valley fever, and even plague still occasionally strike villages, towns, and whole regions. To the dozens or hundreds who suffer painful deaths, and to their loved ones, these diseases must seem to spring upon them from nowhere.

Now NASA-supported scientists are combining high tech tools and field work to develop a space-based system to keep watch on environmental factors and provide early warnings when conditions are ripe for disease outbreaks. For the full story, go to

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/12mar_disease.htm?aol39555

MAPPING A HEALTHY FUTURE OPEN HOUSE

Mapping a Healthy Future will allow visitors to see and participate in some of the latest innovations and technologies in health and medical sciences developed at the University of Washington's Health Sciences Center and its affiliates. The free open house will take place April 23-24 at UW's Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center, 1959 Pacific Avenue Northeast in Seattle.

Many of the open house exhibits are hands-on and interactive, while others feature virtual reality medical presentations, high-tech patient simulators and computerized models of recent research discoveries. There will also be a special lecture and tours of some laboratories. Information will be available on educational and career opportunities in the health sciences. For more information, go to

http://www.washington.edu/hsoh

MYSTERIOUS SEDNA

NASA-funded researchers have discovered the most distant object orbiting the sun. It's a mysterious planet-like body three times farther from Earth than Pluto.

"The sun appears so small from that distance that you could completely block it out with the head of a pin," said Dr. Mike Brown, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, Calif., associate professor of planetary astronomy and leader of the research team. The object, called Sedna for the Inuit goddess of the ocean, is 13 billion kilometers (8 billion miles) away, in the farthest reaches of the solar system.

For the full story, see

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/16mar_sedna.htm

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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