Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

September 9, 2004

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- MINI-GRANTS FOR NSIP PARTICIPANTS (K-12)
-- WHAT WE LEARNED FROM THE MOON (K-12)
-- FIELD TESTERS NEEDED (6-12)
-- THE FIRST EUREKA MOMENT
-- SIGN UP NOW FOR NASA TV (K-12)
-- LPI BULLETIN AVAILABLE ONLINE
-- STEM CELL WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS (7-12)

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MINI-GRANTS FOR NSIP PARTICIPANTS (K-12)

Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium wants to encourage students and teachers to become involved in the 2004-5 NASA Student Involvement Program (NSIP). To help them do so, Space Grant will provide mini-grants in the amount of up to $200 to 12 teachers whose students plan to submit NSIP projects.

NSIP competitions for students in grades K-12 helps students learn firsthand the excitement of exploring science, mathematics, geography and technology. Categories include My Planet Earth, Science and Technology Journalism, and Designing a Lunar-based Mission to Mars. Depending upon the grade level, students may compete as a class, a team or as individuals

The deadline for mini-grant applications is October 15. Teachers will be notified by Oct. 22. For an application, visit

http://www.waspacegrant.org/nsip.html

Information on the 2004-5 NASA Student Involvement Program (NSIP) is available at

http://www.nsip.net/

WHAT WE LEARNED FROM THE MOON (K-12)

Everybody knows that the Apollo program landed men on the Moon, but what did they do while they were there?╩According to NASAexplores, the knowledge gained through Apollo has given us a new understanding of the Moon--and the Earth.

Lessons from NASAexplores are available in packages for grades K-4, 5-8 and 9-12. Also available this week is a lesson package on safety at NASA and how our blood cells might react to space radiation. To access the materials, please visit

http://www.nasaexplores.com/

FIELD TESTERS NEEDED (6-12)

The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) seeks science or technology teachers in grades 6-12 to field test online materials with students. Teachers will receive a $250 stipend for their participation.

The EET is a collection of step-by-step guides for using Earth science datasets and scientific tools for learning. Chapters walk teachers through the how-to of downloading data and using a software tool to analyze it. Chapters are available to analyze populations, explore climate change, examine the relationship between precipitation and streamflow, investigate earthquakes and monitor environmental change.

Tools utilized in the chapters include spreadsheets, image processing software and a GIS. For more information, go to

http://serc.carleton.edu/eet/field_testing.html

THE FIRST EUREKA MOMENT

Archimedes--ranked by historians as one of the three greatest mathematicians--is famous for shouting "Eureka!" (Greek for "I have found it!") on stepping into his bath and realizing that its rising water level showed a way to measure the volume of his king's crown to determine if it was pure gold (it wasn't).

The Einstein of his era, Archimedes had a sophisticated understanding of mathematics, including infinity, and designed marvelous war machines for his native Syracuse to use against invading Romans, one of whom killed him in 212 B.C. Relying on sophisticated image-processing techniques, scholars now believe that Archimedes was closer than anyone suspected to inventing calculus -- the mathematical tool at the heart of advanced science and engineering.

This archive, maintained by applied mathematician Chris Rorres, brims with lore and trivia about Archimedes, as well as links to NOVA's special "Infinite Secrets" on an Archimedes' manuscript, long thought lost. For more information, go to

http://www.math.nyu.edu/~crorres/Archimedes/contents.html

SIGN UP NOW FOR NASA TV (K-12)

The beginning of the school year is a great time to explore the NASA challenges, celebrations and opportunities for educators and students. NASA TV this month features shows on careers, science and technology and how to be among the next generation of explorers.

Multimedia products and online resources related to this theme are also available. For the September schedule and more information, go to

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/education.file

LPI BULLETIN AVAILABLE ONLINE

The Lunar and Planetary Institute's latest newsletter is now available online. This issue focuses on extreme exploration and the Messenger mission to Mercury. There are also updates on Cassini and educational resources. To download a copy of the LPI Bulletin, go to

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lpib

STEM CELL WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS (7-12)

On Oct. 18, the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research will present a free teacher workshop preceding its Stem Cell Public Forum at the University of Washington. Stem cell scientists, other science educators and NWABR education staff will explore how to address stem cell research issues and lesson ideas.

The workshop takes place from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and educators are strongly encouraged to attend the 7-9 p.m. forum in Kane Hall to hear experts in the fields of stem cell research, law/policy, and ethics discuss their perspectives.A complimentary dinner will be served and clock hours will be available through WSTA. Teachers must register by Oct. 11. For more information, visit

http://nwabr.org/education/stemcellforum.htm

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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