Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

February 15, 2005

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- ANCIENT OBSERVATORIES WORKSHOP FEB. 26 (3-12)
-- CURRICULUM FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED (5-12)
-- SCIENCE IN SPACE CHALLENGE (K-12)
-- TSUNAMIS: CAN THEY HAPPEN HERE?
-- NASA BRAIN BITES
-- PROJECT ASTROBIO APPLICATIONS OPEN (3-12)

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ANCIENT OBSERVATORIES WORKSHOP FEB. 26 (3-12)

"Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge," the free workshop focusing on the theme of NASA's Sun-Earth Day 2005, has been rescheduled for February 26.

Dr. Julie Lutz -- research professor of astronomy and director of the NASA Educator Resource Center -- will lead the free workshop featuring the 2005 Sun-Earth Day kit, which includes engaging activities for students, as well as posters, CDs, lithographs and a DVD. All participants will receive a full 2005 kit to use in their classrooms.

The workshop takes place 12:30-4:30 p.m. at the NASA Educator Resource Center, 310 Condon Hall, University of Washington. For more information and registration, visit

http://www.waspacegrant.org/teaworkshops.html

CURRICULUM FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED (5-12)

Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) is seeking science teachers to participate in the field test of their ACE Evolving Universe materials for visually impaired students. A pilot test of the materials was conducted earlier at the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind. The materials are based on the learning module, "Genesis Cosmic Chemistry: Cosmogony."

Throughout the materials, students act as scientists as they study tactile models of specific features of the present universe. They will develop an understanding of the difficulties of conducting science on very large time and distance scales by indirect observation and inference. Feedback can be submitted electronically and is due prior to May 1. For more information, go to

http://www.ace-education.org/

SCIENCE IN SPACE CHALLENGE (K-12)

NASA and Pearson Scott Foresman Publishing Company invite K-12 educators to submit proposals, on behalf of their students, for a science and technology investigation to be conducted on a space mission by a NASA astronaut. Judges will select one entry each from grades K-6 and 7-12. As the astronaut performs the selected investigations, teachers and students can follow along via television or the Internet.

The selected classroom teachers and their school principals will be flown to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to watch the launch of the Space Shuttle. The deadline for entries is June 3. Entries will be judged on uniqueness of concept, compliance with NASA guidelines, possibility of successful outcome, and education impact or value. The winners will be announced on or before September 6. For more information, go to

http://www.scottforesman.com/hot/index.cfm#

TSUNAMIS: CAN THEY HAPPEN HERE?

On Feb. 8. Smithsonian magazine hosted an expert panel discussion on tsunamis, earthquakes and disaster preparedness. Among the participants was University of Washington professor Joanne Bourgeois. The Smithsonian site includes a transcript of the panel discussion and copies of the speakers' presentation materials. For more information, go to

http://www.smithsonianmag.si.edu/smithsonian/issues05/mar05/tsunami_transcript.html

NASA BRAIN BITES

What's a launch window? Why do we only see one side of the moon? How do you go to the bathroom in space? Amusing one-minute videos from NASA answer some of the questions about space you were afraid to ask. For answers, and more questions, go to

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/10feb_brainbites.htm?aol39555

PROJECT ASTROBIO APPLICATIONS OPEN

Project AstroBio, formerly known as Project Astro, is recruiting new teachers and science partners in the Puget Sound area to team up for the purpose of presenting hands-on activities in astronomy, biology, geology, and on the overarching theme of astrobiology in the classroom. The program currently has 42 partnerships representing about 1900 students in participating schools throughout the Puget Sound region.

Applications are due April 15. For more information, go to

http://www.astro.washington.edu/projastrobio/

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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