Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

May 18, 2005

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- MOUNT ST. HELENS: WHAT'S NEXT?
-- THINK SMALL: NANOTECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCES FOR TEACHERS (9-12)
-- ROCKING & ROLLING WITH THE ROVERS
-- FLYBY MATH CURRICULUM AVAILABLE (5-9)
-- ENVIRONMENTAL DATA RESOURCES AVAILABLE (K-12)
-- FREE SCIENCE-RELATED FILMS SCREENINGS (5-12)

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MOUNT ST. HELENS: WHAT'S NEXT?

On June 1, Steve Malone, renowned seismologist and University of Washington research professor, will talk about what we can expect next from Mount St. Helens.

The free public lecture will take place from 7-8:30 p.m. in Kane Hall, Room 120, on the UW Seattle campus. To reserve a seat, call 206-685-2821 or e-mail

geolecture@ess.washington.edu

THINK SMALL: NANOTECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCES FOR TEACHERS (9-12)

The University of Washington—part of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN)—is offering an opportunity for two high school science teachers to participate in a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Teachers will spend two weeks from July 18 - July 29 completing a research project and working with UW scientists to develop nanotechnology teaching modules for high school classrooms.

Each participant will receive a $1,000 stipend upon completion of the RET. In addition, a total of $600 will be available for supplies and to develop teaching modules. Three (3) UW graduate credits will be available to participating teachers at a cost of $163. Applications will be considered as received. For more information, visit

http://www.nano.washington.edu/NINN/RET.html

ROCKING & ROLLING WITH THE ROVERS

Jim Bell, NASA rover team leader and Cornell University professor, will given a free talk June 2 on the Spirit and Opportunity missions on Mars. NASA successfully landed the rovers in January 2004 and since then their Pancam cameras have returned more than 50,000 spectacular color images of ruddy Martian vistas, and their high-resolution capabilities have revealed subtle details of the geology, texture, and composition of the landing sites.

"Rocking and Rolling with Spirit and Opportunity on Mars" takes place at 7:30 p.m. in Kane Hall, Room 120, on the University of Washington Seattle campus. For more information, go to

http://depts.washington.edu/astrobio/news/lectures.html

FLYBY MATH CURRICULUM AVAILABLE (5-9)

The FlyBy Math curriculum was developed by NASA's Airspace Systems Program to engage students in real-life applications of mathematics and science. The curriculum brings interactive math alive through a series of six air traffic control problems. Each problem features a student workbook containing the experiment, paper-and-pencil calculations to support the experiment, and a student analysis of the experiment and calculations, as well as optional pre- and post-tests, and video clips to introduce students to the nation's air traffic control system.

The Airspace Systems Program which developed the lessons creates advanced computer-based systems to help pilots and air traffic controllers operate the nation's air transportation system with reduced flight delays and improved efficiency and access. Using the curriculum materials, students learn to predict air traffic conflicts using distance, rate, and time relationships. For more information, go to

http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/projects/smart_skies/

ENVIRONMENTAL DATA RESOURCES AVAILABLE (K-12)

Two sources of environmental data are now avaliable. It is sometimes hard to visualize patterns of environmental change—including causes and effects of change—in our own neighborhoods or states. It is harder still for most people to imagine changes that occur on a continental or global scale. This educator's resource contains movies and 3-D snapshots of the Earth that allow students to observe our planet changing, over time and space, and to think about what might be the causes or effects of those changes. Visit

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Laboratory/Datasets/

The TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1 sites have been combined to create the new Ocean Surface Topography site. This includes educational resources on weather, climate and and ocean science. For more information, go to

http://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/

FREE SCIENCE-RELATED FILMS SCREENINGS (5-12)

The Seattle International Film Festival is offering three free screenings of science-related films for students and teachers. In the documentary "Genesis", showing after school on May 20 at the Harvard Exit in Seattle, the French directors focus on a rather Darwinist version of "genesis" and offers a striking biology lesson made of evocative myths told by an African storyteller as well as scientific facts in a combination of humorous, dreamlike and serious scenes.

On May 25, there will be two free screenings during the school day. "Deep Blue" (also at the Harvard Exit), a natural history of the oceans was shot around the world in more than 200 locations, takes viewers from bird's-eye views of the sparkling surface to the darkest depths (sometimes more than 15,000 feet down) to convey a riveting sense of nature's infinite variety. In "Earthling" (at the Neptune), wildlife photographer Wolfgang Bayer takes his entire family on one last globe-spanning adventure, where polar bears and family affairs are given equal time in front of the lens.

Tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis. To reserve tickets, contact Liza Comtois at 206-315-0669 or

lizac@seattlefilm.org

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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