Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

July 8, 2005

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- VISIT THE NASA ERC THIS SUMMER (K-12)
-- VISIT EARTH'S 'FAMILY ALBUM'
-- EARTH AT A KEYSTROKE (K-12)
-- AGI EARTH SCIENCE CONTESTS (K-12)
-- NASA LAUNCHES HURRICANE SITE
-- SING A SONG OF SCIENCE (7-12)
-- NEW EARTH SCIENCE PHOTO GALLERY (5-8)

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VISIT THE NASA ERC THIS SUMMER (K-12)

Summer is a great time to visit the NASA Regional Educator Resource Center (ERC). The ERC has NASA posters, curriculum packs, education briefs, educational CDs and other materials. Bring your own tapes and copy NASA videos, or request copying and mailing for only $5 per tape. The ERC also has a collection of books for K-12 students on earth and space sciences, aeronautics and other NASA topics. Books can be checked out for a month.

The ERC—located just off the main University of Washington campus in Condon Hall 315—is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday. Metered on-street parking is available.

Too far away for an ERC visit? Don't feel left out, just drop us an e-mail and let us know what topic you are covering and what grade levels you are teaching. We can point you to Web sites to download free copies of NASA print materials that might supplement your teaching. We can also mail appropriate materials. For a list of available videos, please consult the NASA CORE catalog . Copies may be obtained as described above, or ordered directly from CORE.

For more information on the NASA ERC and a map to Condon Hall, visit

http://www.waspacegrant.org/tresou1.html

or e-mail

nasa@waspacegrant.org

To view the NASA CORE catalog, go to

http://core.nasa.gov

VISIT EARTH'S 'FAMILY ALBUM'

The Virtual Fossil Museum provides an ever-growing extensive collection of images. High-quality pictures of fossils are presented, organized by fossil sites and systematics. Geological history, paleobiology, phylogenetics and evolutionary biology are among information provided.

Operated by a consortium of scientist-volunteers, the images range from a Russian cave bear's toothy skull to trilobites from Oklahoma. To visit the museum, go to

http://www.fossilmuseum.net/

EARTH AT A KEYSTROKE (K-12)

Virtually visit any place in the world through the free computer program World Wind. Look across the Andes, into the Grand Canyon, over the Alps, or along the African Sahara.

Developed through NASA Ames Research Center, World Wind lets you zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth. Leveraging Landsat satellite imagery and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data, World Wind lets you experience Earth terrain in visually rich 3D, just as if you were really there. To download a copy of World Wind, go to

http://www.worldwind.arc.nasa.gov/

AGI EARTH SCIENCE CONTESTS (K-12)

The American Geological Institute (AGI) has launched three national contests—visual arts for grades K-5, essay for grades 5-8, and photography, open to all students and adults. The contests are aimed at promoting activities related to this year's Earth Science Week theme, "Geoscientists Explore the Earth".

Entries must be received by Oct. 7. The grand prize winner in each category will receive $300 and a one-year subscription to "Geotimes", AGI's monthly newsmagazine for the earth sciences. For complete rules and entry forms, go to

http://www.earthsciweek.org/contests

NASA LAUNCHES HURRICANE SITE

NASA has launched a new resource page highlighting the agency's diverse hurricane research. The page is just in time for the 2005 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season, which officially runs from June 1 through November 30.

"Hurricane 2005" includes a compilation of data from various satellites and computer models, and it explains why and how NASA investigates hurricanes. It also covers the relationship of NASA's research focus as compared to other agencies' operational emphasis. For more information, go to

http://www.nasa.gov/hurricane

SING A SONG OF SCIENCE (7-12)

Setting physics to music can amplify students' learning and enjoyment, according to Walter Smith, physics professor at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. To support his theory, the professor has created a Web site with an archive of hundreds of scientific tunes, including many compositions that he co-wrote. In addition to chord charts and lyrics, there are even song files.

For more information, visit

http://www.haverford.edu/physics-astro/songs/

NEW EARTH SCIENCE PHOTO GALLERY (5-8)

Middle school educators can supplement their Earth science units and brighten their classrooms at the same time. The SciJinks Weather Laboratory Web site has added an image gallery collected and categorized specifically to enrich topics usually covered in middle-school science texts.

The site contains high-resolution color images with simple captions in a large font, and are sized for printing on standard-sized paper. Categories include weather, clouds, oceans, landforms, glaciers, volcanoes, and satellites. Visit SciJinks at

http://scijinks.jpl.nasa.gov/en/educators/

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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