Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

December 14, 2005

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- HELP ANALYZE STARDUST DATA
-- SCIENCE CAMP SCHOLARSHIPS (12)
-- EINSTEIN FELLOWSHIPS FOR TEACHERS (K-12)
-- THINK MARS THIS SUMMER (7-12)
-- POLAR REGIONS, REMOTE SENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE (K-12)
-- TWO NASA BROADCASTING PROGRAMS AVAILABLE (3-12)
-- DECEMBER NEWSLETTER ANNOUNCEMENT

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HELP ANALYZE STARDUST DATA

On Jan. 15, the Stardust mission will return with samples of a comet. Stardust flew through the tail of Comet Wild 2 last January and gathered particles in a special aerogel substance.

When the mission returns, the aerogel collectors that were exposed to the interstellar dust will be scanned by an automated microscope at the Cosmic Dust Lab at Johnson Space Center. By studying this dust, scientists hope to learn about the origins of the solar system, and the ingredients were that went into making it.

Now the Stardust team is seeking volunteers to help search for these tiny samples of matter from the galaxy, using a virtual microscope (VM). Volunteers must go through a Web-based training session and pass a test to participate. After passing the test and registering, volunteers will be able to download a virtual microscope (VM) that will automatically connect to the Stardust server.

To volunteer. go to http://stardustathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/participation.html

For Stardust classroom resources and activities, go to

http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/classroom/products.html

SCIENCE CAMP SCHOLARSHIPS (12)

High school seniors are eligible to receive a full scholarship to the 2006 National Youth Science Camp in the Monongahela National Forest outside Charleston, W. Va., where they will exchange ideas with scientists and others from the academic and corporate worlds. The three-week experience includes lectures and hands-on research projects presented by scientists from across the nation and a visit to Washington D.C. Some students will have the opportunity to spend the night at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory where they will learn how to operate a 40-foot radio telescope.

Students must demonstrate academic achievement in science and show potential for scientific leadership. Students will arrive on Sunday, June 25, and will depart on Sunday, July 16. The application deadline is February 17. For more information, go to

http://www.nysc.org

EINSTEIN FELLOWSHIPS FOR TEACHERS (K-12)

Do you know a K-12 educator who would make a difference in Washington, DC? The Einstein Fellowship program brings outstanding mathematics, science, and technology education teachers to Washington to spend a school year working on Capitol Hill or in one of several participating federal agencies, bringing their unique insights, and know-how about the classroom to policymakers and program managers.

The application deadline for the 2006-2007 cycle is January 10, 2006. Forward the name and e-mail of the teacher to the address below and they will be personally invited to apply:

modmanna@triangle-coalition.org

For more information, visit

http://www.trianglecoalition.org/ein.htm

THINK MARS THIS SUMMER (7-12)

The Phoenix Mars Lander and Mars 2001 Odyssey missions are inviting eight pairs of middle and/or high school science teachers to immerse themselves in a weeklong summer field experience in Fairbanks Alaska featuring current polar science research on both Earth and Mars.

During the field experience, participants will learn about polar processes and climate change on both Earth and Mars; use remote sensing data to characterize arctic research sites on both Earth and Mars; and investigate engineering challenges associated with exploring the Martian arctic. They will also collect and chemically analyze arctic soil and ice samples at the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel, an underground research facility north of Fairbanks.

Applications are due Feb. 15. For an application and more information, go to

http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/alaska_workshop

POLAR REGIONS, REMOTE SENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE (K-12)



CReSIS focuses on topics related to global climate change and remote sensing. Web site entries for K-12 resources include a short description and identify national science, geography, and math education standards that are supported.

http://www.cresis.ku.edu/EducationIndex.htm

TWO NASA BROADCASTING PROGRAMS AVAILABLE (3-12)

Two NASA broadcasts offer students inside looks at cutting edge research and emerging technologies. NASA's Destination Tomorrow is a series of 30-minute educational programs that focus on NASA research, including advanced aerodynamics, past achievements and medical breakthroughs.

Each program gives an inside look at NASA and demonstrates how research and technology relates to our everyday lives. For more information, go to

http://destination.larc.nasa.gov/

NASA LIVE, a series of free videoconferencing programs, makes full use of NASA's aerospace technology assets to produce exciting and meaningful learning experiences for students grades in 3-12, educators, faculty, and adult learners. To participate, go to

http://live.larc.nasa.gov/

DECEMBER NEWSLETTER ANNOUNCEMENT

Due to the holidays and our move back to Johnson Hall, there will be only one electronic newsletter this month. We will return to our twice-monthly publishing schedule in January.

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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