Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

March 30, 2006

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- PODCASTING AND BLOGGING 101: A WORKSHOP
-- ASTOUNDING ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP (3-8)
-- THINK SMALL: NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHERS (9-12)
-- ASTRONOMY OPEN HOUSE APRIL 29
-- RESEARCHERS FIND MOONQUAKES COMMON
-- MANY FACES OF OUR NEAREST STAR

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PODCASTING AND BLOGGING 101: A WORKSHOP

What exactly is a podcast? Or a blog? Catch up with the latest in technology and learn how these new easy-to-use communication tools can help formal and informal educators in the classroom and out through a free workshop on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.

On Sunday, April 9, Harvard Science Center's Pamela Gay of the podcast Slacker Astronomy and Tacoma Astronomical Society's Alice Few of Astronomy a Go-Go! will teach the basics of podcasts and blogs. The workshop takes place 2-4 p.m. in Room 162 of Johnson Hall.

The workshop introduces some already popular podcasts and provides ideas for how they can be used in the classroom and in outreach work. Participants will also be shown resources to launch their own productions and even create their own podcasts during the workshop. Preregistration is required. For more information, go to

http://www.waspacegrant.org/teaworkshops.html

ASTOUNDING ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP (3-8)

Astounding Astronomy, an intensive three-day workshop on our solar system and more, will take place July 10-12 at Heritage University in Toppenish. The workshop--sponsored by Space Science Network Northwest, the Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium and the Kenilworth Fund--will cover seasons; constellations; phases of the moon; the planets and their satellites; comets, meteors and asteroids.

The registration deadline is June 9. Participants will be selected on a first-come, first-served basis. Applicants will be notified of acceptance by e-mail. Participants will receive a stipend to help defray expenses. Once enrollment reaches 20 particpants, people will be put on a waiting list. For more information, visit

http://www.s2n2.org/astounding/

THINK SMALL: NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHERS (9-12)

This summer Washington teachers have two opportunities to explore the fascinating new field of nanotechnology. Both programs provide stipends for successful completion.

The first is the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at the UW Center for Nanotechnology. High school science teachers will participate in a 10-day laboratory immersion, familiarizing them with the burgeoning field of nanoscale science and engineering, assisting them in developing teaching tools, and enhancing their enthusiasm and effectiveness for promoting students' pursuit of careers in nanotechnology.

To register for the RET program, go to

http://www.nano.washington.edu/NINN/RET.html

BioNano 2006 RET is a weeklong research experience learning about biomimetic nanoscale science and technology using current laboratory techniques, instrumentation, and approaches. The workshop is taught by the Genetically Engineered Materials Science and Engineering Center, an interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from the fields of biology and materials sciences and engineering. The registration deadline is May 1.

To register, go to

http://depts.washington.edu/gemsec/education/RET.html

ASTRONOMY OPEN HOUSE APRIL 29

"Bringing Space Home" is the theme of this year's open house at the University of Washington's Department of Astronomy.

The open house will include planetarium shows, children's activities and special talk by Don Brownlee, astronomy professor and project scientist for the recently returned Stardust Mission. Samples gathered by Stardust have surprised scientists, indicating the formation of at least some comets may have included materials ejected by the early sun to the far reaches of the solar system.

The open house is part of UW's annual Washington Weekend. For a complete schedule of astronomy events, visit

http://www.astro.washington.edu/openhouse/

For other Washington Weekend events, go to

http://www.washington.edu/alumni/weekend/

RESEARCHERS FIND MOONQUAKES COMMON

NASA astronauts are going back to the moon and when they get there they may need quake-proof housing.

That's the surprising conclusion of Clive R. Neal, associate professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame after he and a team of 15 other planetary scientists reexamined Apollo data from the 1970s. "The moon is seismically active," he told a gathering of scientists at NASA's Lunar Exploration Analysis Group (LEAG) meeting. To read the whole story, visit

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/15mar_moonquakes.htm?list820645

MANY FACES OF OUR NEAREST STAR

As the star at the center of our solar system, the Sun makes life on Earth possible. Telescopes capture the Sun's ultraviolet light as beautiful images that are full of information about solar processes.

Visit the American Museum of Natural History's Sunscapes interactive gallery at

http://www.amnh.org/resources/rfl/web/sunscapes

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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