Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

October 5, 2006

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- UPCOMING ASTRONOMY/PHYSICS MEETING (9-14)
-- NASA KIDS CLUB OFFERINGS (K-4)
-- CAREER IDEAS FOR STUDENTS (4-12+)
-- SCHOOLYARD GEOLOGY MADE EASY (1-12)
-- WORLD WARMTH EDGING ANCIENT LEVELS
-- SUN-EARTH DAY EVENTS BEGIN

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UPCOMING ASTRONOMY/PHYSICS MEETING (9-14)

Washington high school teachers and community college instructors who teach physics and/or astronomy have a chance to attend this winter's joint meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) at a special educator rate.

The meeting will take place from January 5-10, 2007 at the Washington Convention and Trade Center in Seattle. Educators who attend the meetings are eligible for the special rate, even if they aren't members of the parent societies. Each society has posted information on their individual sessions and workshops. Educators should check the Web sites for both societies to determine which registration makes the most sense for them.

For more information, see

http://www.aapt.org/Events/WM2007/index.cfm (AAPT)
http://www.aas.org/meetings/prelim.html (AAS)

NASA KIDS CLUB OFFERINGS (K-4)

NASA Kids' Club is a games-based Web site that stimulates children's interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics by incorporating five skill levels, national education standards and NASA content.

For a flier and a brochure describing the educational value, samples of the games and how to access the NASA Kids' Club (as well as links to the club), visit

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/NASA_Kids_Club_Brochure.html

CAREER IDEAS FOR STUDENTS (4-12+)

What do I want to be when I grow up? A new career Web site can help students—and their parents—explore dozens of in-demand jobs and high-growth industries.

Career Voyages, operated by for the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education, shows the education and skills needed for careers in fields such as energy, health care, information technology and emerging areas such as biotechnology. It also includes a special section for elementary students, which includes short films of people at work, and a Spanish-language version of the section for parents.

For more information, go to

http://www.careervoyages.gov/

SCHOOLYARD GEOLOGY MADE EASY (1-12)

Wish you could take more field trips? You can! The U.S. Geological Survey has created a Web site filled with activities and examples of what to look for to turn your schoolyard into a rich geologic experience.

Lessons cover mapping the school grounds and learning how to describe rocks and use those descriptions to discover the geologic history of the rock. Once trained, students explore their schoolyard searching for evidence of sequences of events just like geologists in the field. To begin, visit

http://education.usgs.gov/schoolyard/

WORLD WARMTH EDGING ANCIENT LEVELS

A new study by NASA climatologists finds that the world's temperature is reaching a level that has not been seen in thousands of years. This warming is forcing a migration of plant and animal species toward the poles. For the complete story, plus more links to information on climate change, visit

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NasaNews/2006/2006092523209.html

SUN-EARTH DAY EVENTS BEGIN

In 2007, NASA Sun-Earth Day's theme will be "Living in the Atmosphere of the Sun." Sun-Earth Day is a combination of programs and events throughout the year ending with a Sun-Earth Day celebration on or near the Spring Equinox in March.

Next year is also the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), which celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year, a research push that produced an unprecedented level of understanding of geospace and saw the start of the Space Age. IHY is aimed at discovering the physical mechanisms that link Earth and the heliosphere to solar activities.

Upcoming Sun-Earth Day activities include a Nov. 8 broadcast of the Transit of Mercury discussing the science, technology and history of the transit as well as our knowledge of the Sun and space weather. Sun-Earth Day resource packets with mission materials (STEREO, THEMIS, and Voyager) and a space weather poster will also be distributed. For more information, go to

http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/

For information on the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), see

http://ihy2007.org/

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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