Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

November 21, 2006

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- SCIENCE NOTEBOOKS WEB SITE (K-12)
-- SHUTTLE MISSIONS GEARING UP
-- AIR TRANSPORTATION IN 2057 (9-12)
-- WASHINGTON AEROSPACE SCHOLARS (11)
-- SCIENCE, WRITING AND MORE (K-5)
-- MISSING MOONS EQUAL NEW RINGS?

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SCIENCE NOTEBOOKS WEB SITE (K-12)

Science Notebooks in K12 Classrooms, developed online by the North Cascades and Olympic Science Partnership, led by Western Washington University, provides resources to help teachers develop their students' science notebooks a place where they can develop, practice, and refine the science understanding, while also enhancing reading, writing, mathematics and communications skills.

The site includes classroom lessons, research citations, and frequently asked questions about science notebooks. Teachers can submit new samples of student work, assessment tools, writing templates, or other resources so that the site can grow and evolve based on the needs and interests of its users.

To explore the site, visit

http://www.sciencenotebooks.org/

SHUTTLE MISSIONS GEARING UP

On Dec. 7, the launch window opens for the Space Shuttle Discovery's next mission. The STS-116 mission will be the 20th flight to the International Space Station. In 2008, a mission is planned to service the Hubble Space Telescope. For the latest shuttle information, visit

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html

AIR TRANSPORTATION IN 2057 (9-12)

The NASA Aeronautics Competition asks high school students to imagine how air and space transportation will change in the next 50 years due to the successful implementation of supersonic and/or hypersonic technologies, then write about those changes.

Students may participate as individuals or as teams. A notice of intent to participate containing student and teacher names, along with school, grade level and contact information should be filed by Dec. 15. Entries are due March 15, 2007. First place winners will receive $1,500 for best team entry and $1,000 for best individual entry. For detail, go to

http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/competitions_high.htm

WASHINGTON AEROSPACE SCHOLARS (11)

The Washington Aerospace Scholars program for high school juniors is a statewide, interactive online learning experience, offering a six-day residential internship for select students at The Museum of Flight in Seattle. Washington Aerospace Scholars are encouraged to study math, science, engineering and computer science as they interact with engineers and educators involved in aerospace.

To participate, students must be U.S. citizens, state residents, and age 16 or older. For more information, go to the Museum of Flight Education page and click on Washington Aerospace Scholars program at

http://www.museumofflight.org

SCIENCE, WRITING AND MORE (K-12)

Teachers outside the Seattle School District are welcome to attend a series of professional development classes on science and writing, as well as the Initial Use class sessions.

The science and writing classes are taught by grade level and include suggestions about notebook entries for each grade level's science units; modeling of written feedback, assessment techniques and mini-lessons to develop students' expository writing skills; and samples of student work. In Initial Use classes, participants gain understanding of the components of good standards-based science instruction: needed science content, pedagogy of inquiry-based science, philosophy, lessons, management of the units, and assessment.

Out of district teachers must pay an enrollment fee of $50 for Science and Expository Writing; $80 for Initial Use Class. For more information and registration, go to the Seattle School District's professional development home page

https://www.seattleschools.org/area/profdev/index.dxml

For questions, contact Penny Knutzen at 206-252-0060, or e-mail

ppknutzen@seattleschools.org

MISSING MOONS EQUAL NEW RINGS?

Cassini scientists are on the trail of the missing moons of Saturn. A recent observation by the spacecraft leads them to believe that they will find the moons near newly discovered rings around the planet.

During an unprecedented opportunity, with the sun poised behind Saturn, Cassini scientists discovered two new rings and confirmed the presence of two others. The new rings are associated with one or more small moons and share their orbits with the moons, while scientists suspect a moon is lurking near a third ring.

"Just like the old maxim that says where there's smoke, there's fire, at Saturn, where there's a new ring, there's bound to be a moon," said Dr. Jeff Cuzzi, Cassini interdisciplinary scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. Read more at

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/media/cassini-20061011c.html

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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