Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

January 24, 2007

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- CHEMISTRY GRANTS FOR TEACHERS (K-12)
-- BLACK HOLES FOR EVERYONE (K-12+)
-- LUNAR TRANSIENT PHENOMENA
-- NASA OCEAN SITE TEACHERS' TOP PICK
-- NOMINATE AN EARTH EXPLORER! (K-4)

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CHEMISTRY GRANTS FOR TEACHERS (K-12)

The Puget Sound chapter of the American Chemical Society is seeking to award one-year grants of up to $500 to area K-12 teachers for supplies and equipment for high school students to do chemistry demonstrations at elementary and middle schools; for selected chemistry journals and books, including safety and waste disposal texts; for teacher supplies and equipment to develop new chemistry experiments; and for teachers to attend chemistry courses, symposia or institutes.

Teachers are asked to submit a one-page proposal. Preference will be given to teachers who are extending their range of competence. The deadline to apply is April 20. Proposals will also be accepted again in the fall. That deadline is Sept. 21.

For more detail, contact Clarita C. Bhat at

claritabhat@yahoo.com

BLACK HOLES FOR EVERYONE (K-12+)

On March 3, the LIGO Hanford Observatory will host a black hole festival, giving astronomy buffs from beginners to veterans a chance explore their black hole questions in a fun and informal family setting.

Over two dozen hands-on exhibits, experiments and demonstrations, including activities for preschool and elementary children, will provide science stimulation for all ages. Tours of the facility will take place throughout the afternoon. No reservations are necessary and admission will be free. LIGO's facilities are accessible.

For more information, go to

http://www.ligo-wa.caltech.edu/

LUNAR TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

If you stare at the Moon long enough, you start seeing things.

"82 things to be exact," says Bill Cooke, leader of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Group.

That's how many "transient phenomena" the group has videotaped since they started monitoring the night side of the Moon in November 2005.

"In 107 hours of observing, we've tallied 20 lunar meteors, plus at least 50 Earth-orbiting satellites, plus one airplane, plus one terrestrial meteor...," Cooke says. To read more and watch the videotape, go to

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/23jan_ltps.htm?list820645

NASA OCEAN SITE TEACHERS' TOP PICK

The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center's Laboratory for Ocean Color Users (LOCUS) offers teachers a variety of resources for teaching about the oceans and remote sensing.

In December, the site was chosen as the top pick of teachers utilizing The Bridge, an online educational resources site for oceanographic educators, jointly sponsored by the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA), the National Sea Grant Program, and the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP).

For educator resources, go to the Science Focus page at

http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/oceancolor/locus/index.shtml

NOMINATE AN EARTH EXPLORER! (K-4)

Who are the NASA Earth Explorers? They are the elementary school student wondering how El Niño will affect tomorrow's weather; the scientist studying connections between ozone and climate change; and the farmer using satellite pictures to keep track of crops.

The Earth Explorer monthly news series profiles people who working with NASA Earth science data and imagery to better understand our home planet. Now NASA would like to hear from its readers about the Earth Explorers that they know. Earth Explorer nominations should be sent to Dan Stillman at

dan_stillman@strategies.org

For more information, go to

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/home/F_Meet_the_Next_Earth_Explorers.html

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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