Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

March 11, 2008

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- STARDUST: MISSION ACCOMPLISHED (9-12)
-- AFTERSCHOOL UNIVERSE (5-8)
-- NEW DATA ON OLD LIGHT
-- SCIENCE TO GO (4-6)
-- NEW WORLDS LECTURE

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STARDUST: MISSION ACCOMPLISHED (9-12)

Join University of Washington astrobiologist Graciela Matrajt and astronomer Julie Lutz for a workshop on the results of the Stardust Mission which returned a sample of comet dust to the Earth. The workshop will include a visit to the UW Stardust sample analysis laboratory, a talk by Dr. Matrajt on the comet particle analyses and classroom activities demonstrated by Dr. Lutz.

Stardust: Mission Accomplished will take place April 12, 9 a.m.-noon, in Room A216 of the UW Physics and Astronomy Building in Seattle. Clock hours will be available for purchase. To register, send your name, e-mail, phone number and grade levels that you teach to Dr. Lutz at

jlutz@astro.washington.edu

AFTERSCHOOL UNIVERSE (5-8)

Afterschool Universe is an out-of-school-time program that explores astronomy concepts through hands-on activities and takes participants on a journey through the Universe beyond the solar system.

The program currently consists of 12 sessions. Each session typically requires 45-60 minutes for implementation. The site includes a comprehensive manual and materials checklist.

To download the manual and learn more, see

http://universe.nasa.gov/au/

NEW DATA ON OLD LIGHT

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has produced a wealth of precise and accurate cosmological information including:

Last Friday. NASA released five years of data from the project, which measures a remnant of the early universe - its oldest light. The light patterns across the sky encode a wealth of details about the history, shape, content, and ultimate fate of the universe. For more information, go to

http://wmap.gsfc.nasa.gov/

SCIENCE TO GO (4-6)

Free To-Go Kits on science topics including rockets and GPS navigation are available for teachers and informal educators of students in grades 4-6.

The kits, distributed by Colorado NASA Space Grant Consortium, contains all the supplies needed to facilitate the activity for up to 30 students, including a CD with file of all handouts and supplementary documentation. The kits are designed to be used multiple times with different groups.

The supply of kits is limited. For complete information, go to

http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/outreach/

NEW WORLDS LECTURE

On March 20, astronomer Michelle Thaller of the Spitzer Science Center at CalTech will speak on "New Worlds: The Discoveries of the Spitzer Space Telescope." The talk takes place at 7 p.m. at the Gig Harbor High School auditorium, 5101 Rosedale St. NW in Gig Harbor.

Launched into space in 2003, the Spitzer Space Telescope is the largest infrared telescope ever launched into space, and the final element in NASA's Great Observatories Program. Its highly sensitive instruments give us a unique view of the Universe and allow us to peer into regions of space which are hidden from optical telescopes.

The talks is sponsored by Key Peninsula Middle School, a NASA Explorer School. For more information, call 253-530-4200 or e-mail

bordersk@psd401.net

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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