Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

July 6, 2010

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- EARTHKAM SUMMER MISSION (5-8)
-- WASHINGTON ON WATER (K-12)
-- NASA ENGINEERING CHALLENGE (9-12)
-- SPACE SCHOOL MUSICAL (5-12)
-- SPACE ARTS COMPETITION (5-12)
-- INTERACTIVE MATH TOOL (5-9)

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EARTHKAM SUMMER MISSION (5-8)

Middle school educators are invited to join NASA for the International Space Station EarthKAM Summer 2010 Mission from July 13 - 16, 2010.

Sponsored by NASA, EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students) is an educational outreach program that allows middle school students to take pictures of Earth from a digital camera on board the International Space Station.

For more information about the project and to register for the upcoming mission, visit

http://earthkam.ucsd.edu/

WASHINGTON ON WATER (K-12)

Washington on Water (WOW) is a new website designed to help K-12 teachers zero in on marine education resources available statewide.

WOW, developed by Washington Sea Grant, provides information on regional marine science topics, from interior watersheds to the outer coast. Its database also contains information on national marine education resources that are relevant to the Pacific Northwest.

The database may be searched by four categories: classroom resources, field activities, professional development and funding. For more information, go to

http://www.wsg.washington.edu/education/resources/index.html

NASA ENGINEERING CHALLENGE (9-12)

The RealWorld-InWorld NASA Engineering Design Challenge encourages high school students to explore and build skills necessary for STEM careers through two phases of project-based learning and team competition.

In Phase 1, teams work cooperatively as engineers and scientists to explore and design solutions for one of two real-world problems related to the James Webb Space Telescope. Teams who submit their final project solutions by Dec. 15, 2010 will be eligible to move into the second phase, working in a 3D virtual environment and consulting with Webb engineers to refine their designs.

For more information, go to

http://www.nasarealworldinworld.org/

SPACE SCHOOL MUSICAL (5-12)

NASA Discovery and New Frontiers Program bring the solar system alive in "Space School Musical," a 35-minute musical play that combines science with music, fun lyrics, and simple choreography.

Students in school or afterschool programs can watch the video, learn the songs, and even perform the play themselves. There are links to hands-on activities, videos highlighting young, diverse scientists, engineers and interns at JPL, and a glossary of the terms used in the songs.

The musical is available as a free resource at

http://discovery.nasa.gov/musical/index.html

SPACE ARTS COMPETITION (5-12)

Next April. experts from around the world will gather in Houston for the International Academy of Astronautics Humans in Space Symposium. As part of this event, students ages 10-17 are invited to express their ideas about the future of human space exploration through visual, literary, musical or digital art.

Submissions will be judged on creativity, skill, and demonstration of meaning relevant to expressing "What is the future of human space exploration, and why is it important?" Winning art will be displayed in an online gallery, and winners will be invited to attend the symposium in person.

Submissions must be received by Sept. 30, 2010. For more information and a complete list of guidelines, visit

http://www.humansinspaceart.org

INTERACTIVE MATH TOOL (5-9)

NASA has released an online tool that enables students to simultaneously visualize and manipulate three linked representations of a distance-rate-time problem.

The side-by-side tool format features two airplanes (each flying at a constant speed) on merging jet routes, the corresponding distance-vs.-time graphs, and the corresponding linear equations. Students can manipulate an airplane's speed and starting position on its route, rotate or shift the associated line on the graph, and change the parameters of the associated equation.

Free classroom materials include the tool, student workbooks, assessments, teacher guides, and alignments to grades 5-9 mathematics standards for all states. For more information, go to

http://www.smartskies.nasa.gov/flyby

FEEDBACK

Ideas, comments and Web sites of interest to other teachers should be sent to Irene Svete, newsletter editor, at isvete@u.washington.edu

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