Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium

September 7, 2011

WSGC Newsletter for Educators

The Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium's electronic newsletter for teachers provides curriculum ideas, Internet links and other resources to help you better meet the Washington EALRs and the National Science Education Standards.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

-- DIME & WING COMPETITION OPENS (6-12)
-- GRAVITY KEEPS US TOGETHER (K-12)
-- SCIENTIST FOR A DAY CONTEST (5-12)
-- GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION (9-12)

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DIME & WING COMPETITION OPENS (6-12)

DIME (Dropping In a Microgravity Environment) and WING (What If No Gravity?) encourages student teams to design and build a science experiment that will then be tested next spring in a NASA microgravity drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

DIME is for high school teams and WING is for student teams in grades 6-9. These programs are school-yearlong projects which mimic the research process used by NASA and academic researchers. Four DIME teams will be invited to participate in DIME Drop Days at NASA Glenn Research Center in April 2011. The WING teams' experiments will be tested by the NASA WING staff

DIME and WING proposals are due by November 1, 2011. For more information, visit

http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/DIME.html

GRAVITY KEEPS US TOGETHER (K-12)

The Year of the Solar System topic for this month is gravity. Gravity helped form our solar system, the planets and the stars. It holds the planets in orbit around the Sun, and moons in orbit around the planets. Unlike many space science concepts, this topic lends itself to hands-on experiments in the classroom.

The Year of the Solar System website features multiple resources, activities and a calendar highlighting events, as well as an opportunity for visitors to share their own photographs, artwork, music, or stories about their YSS experiences. Each month is a different topic. For more information, go to

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/yss/display.cfm?Year=2011&Month=9&Tab=Educational%20Resources

SCIENTIST FOR A DAY CONTEST (5-12)

The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three possible observations taken by Cassini and choose the one they think will yield the best scientific results. This choice must be supported in a 500-word essay.

Winners and their classmates will participate in a teleconference with Cassini scientists. The competition is divided into three groups: grades 5-6, 7-8, and 9-12. Each student may submit only one entry. All entrants will receive a certificate of participation.

The submission deadline is October 26. For complete rules, go to

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday10thedition/

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION (9-12)

PBS TeacherLine is recruiting high school science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) teachers willing to help evaluate the effectiveness of a new online graduate course, STEM417: Global Climate Change Education for High School.

A NASA grant is funding the research study and the development of the GCC Course. Participants will receive a $50 stipend for completing the evaluation and for completing a PBS TeacherLine online STEM course this fall. The course enrollment fee will be covered by the study.

For more information, go to

http://gw.vtrenz.net/?STPSIO8WD4

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